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Belles of the Creek Nation, and the Redbone Ashworth Act

BCN front matter

Belles of the Creek Nation

Saga of the Hill and Doyle Indian Families and their familial ties to the Redbones, and Texas’ “Ashworth Act”.

Jackson doyle son of nimrod Islands

Jackson Doyle, son of Nimrod and Elizabeth Islands Doyle and along with his siblings are mentioned in the so called “Ashworth Act”.


 

 

1879 Jackson Doyle application land

Land Purchase in Texas

LAWS
PASSED BY
THE SEVENTH CONGRESS
OF THE
REPUBLIC OF TEXAS
PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY.
WASHINGTON:
1843

LAWS
OF THE
REPUBLIC OF TEXAS.

PRIVATE ACTS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS
PASSED BY THE SEVENTH CONGRESS.
A “An act for the relief of William Ashworth, and others,” passed January 16th, 1843-directs the Commissioner of the General Land Office to issue patents, on certain conditions, to William Ashworth, Abner Ashworth, Aaron Ashworth, the heirs of Moses Ashworth, deceased, Henry Bird, John Bird and Aaron Nelson.
B “A Joint resolution for the relief of William Bryan,” approved January 16th, 1843-directs the Auditor to audit the claims of said Bryan, for $21,859 71; one fourth part thereof to be paid on the first day of January, 1845, one fourth on the first day of January, 1846, one fourth on the first day of January, 1847, and one fourth on the first day of January, 1848; and to issue to him corresponding drafts, in convenient amounts, receivable, when due, for all dues to the Government; and repeals the appropriation, in favor of said Bryan, made at the regular session of the sixth Congress.
C “An act to authorize the Court of Probate of any county to open the succession of John R. Cuningham,” deceased, approved January 3d, 1843-empowers the Probate Court of any county in the Republic to grant letters of administration upon the estate of the said deceased.
D “An act for the relief of Winchester Doyle, Jackson Doyle. and Muscogee Doyle, children of Nimrod Doyle,” approved January 16th, 1843-invests the said children with all the rights and privileges of free citizens of the Republic.
F “Joint resolution, repealing a part of a joint resolution for the honorable discharge of Doctor Edmund J. Felder,” approved 18th January, 1842-repeals the proviso contained in said resolution.
G “A Joint resolution for the relief of J. Pinckney Henderson,” approved January 3d, 1843-directs the Auditor to audit the claim of said Henderson, for $7,461, receivable for direct taxes.
H “A joint resolution for the relief of Samuel Hughes, E. H. Campbell and James Moore,” passed January 4th, 1843–directs the Commissioner of the General Land Office to issue to them, upon certain conditions, a patent for a league and labor of land each.
J “An act for the relief of William J. Jones,” passed December 27th, 1842-directs the Auditor to settle the accounts of said Jones, as Pay-master of the first Regiment of the second Brigade of Texas militia, upon equitable principles.
N Joint resolution for the relief of Messrs. Neighbours and Rivers,” approved January 16th, 1843-directs the Auditor to audit, upon certain conditions, their accounts, in favor of James Wright, their agent, for $145.
T “Joint resolution for the relief of Jacob Tator,” passed January 4th, 1843-directs the Commissioner of the General Land Office to issue to said Tator, upon certain conditions, a patent for one third of a league of land; and also. directs the Secretary of War to issue to James J. Weir, a warrant for 320 acres of land, for military services.
W “A joint resolution for the relief of Elizabeth Washburn, Armstead Bennett, and others,” passed January 16th, 1843-directs the Commissioner of the General Land Office to issue patents, upon certain conditions, to the following persons, viz: to Elizabeth Washburn, for one league and labor; to Armstead Bennett, assignee of Mecum Main, for one labor; to Thomas Lagow, assignee of Reuben Brown, for one labor; to Dickerson Parker, assignee of John Parker, Jr., for 369 acres; and to John Parker, assignee of Stephen Crist, for one labor of land.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS. PROCLAMATION.
Whereas, by a Proclamation issued on the eleventh day of February, A. D. 1840, in contravention of law and Treaty stipulations, by Mirabeau B. Lamar, (then President,) “the duties on all wines, the product of France, imported direct from any of the Ports of France, in French or Texian Vessels” were abolished: And whereas, in further violation of law and Treaty stipulations, “all collectors of customs were required to permit all wines, as aforesaid, to be admitted free of duty, into any of the ports of this Republic, until this proclamation shall be revoked by the President:” And whereas, neither propriety, policy nor a just regard due to the rights of our citizens requires the continuance of such an immunity to any foreign power: And whereas, other Governments have made the same a cause of complaint to this:-
Therefore, be it known that I, SAM HOUSTON, President of the Republic of Texas, by virtue of the power vested in me by law, do, hereby, solemnly revoke the said proclamation, and require all collectors of customs in the Republic to demand and receive the duties imposed upon wines, the product of France, imported into Texas, according to the rates established by law, and by the existing Treaty between the two countries: This proclamation to be in force and take effect from and after the fifteenth day of February next.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto signed my name, and caused the great seal of the Republic to be affixed.
Done at the town of Washington, the twenty-first day of December, in the year of our Lord one [L. s.] thousand eight hundred and forty two, and of the Independence of Texas the seventh.
SAM. HOUSTON. By the President:
ANSON JONES, Secretary of State.
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS.
PROCLAMATION.
Whereas, by an act of Congress of the Republic of Texas, approved February 5th, 1840, the eighth section, it is provided, that all free persons of color shall remove out of this Republic, within two years from the passage of said act, under certain penalties:
And whereas, it has been represented to me, that there are a number of honest and industrious persons of that description, who have been citizens of this country for a number of years, and have always heretofore conducted themselves so as to obtain the confidence and good opinion of all acquainted with them, and are now anxious to be permitted to remain in the Republic for the next two years, from and after the fifth day of February next:
Therefore, be it known, that I, SAM. HOUSTON, President of the Republic of Texas, in virtue of the power and authority vested in me by the constitution and the law, do, in the name and by the authority of said Republic, issue this, my proclamation, remitting the penalty of the law that might otherwise attach against them for remaining in the Republic; to be in effect and operative for the term of two years from the fifth day of February next: Provided, those who wish to obtain the benefit of this proclamation, apply to the Chief Justice of the county in which they reside, and make satisfactory proof of their good character, and also enter into bond and security, in the penal sum of five hundred dollars, payable to the President and his successors in office, for their good behavior during the term specified in this proclamation.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto signed my name, and caused the great seal of the Republic to be affixed.
Done at the town of Washington, the. twenty-first day of December, in the year of our Lord one [L. S.] thousand eight hundred and forty two, and of the Independence of Texas the seventh.
SAM. HOUSTON. By the President:
ANSON JONES, Secretary of State.
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS. PROCLAMATION.
To all and singular to whom these presents shall come,-Greeting:
Whereas a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, between the Republic of Texas and Great Britain, was concluded and signed by the Plenipotentiaries of this Republic and her Britanic Majesty, at the city of London, on the thirteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty; which Treaty is, word for word, as follows: